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Iran and Saudi Arabia

Pakistan smashed between two age-old rivals

https://www.ibtimes.co.uk/iran-vs-saudi-arabia-middle-east-cold-war-explained-1535968

https://www.ibtimes.co.uk/iran-vs-saudi-arabia-middle-east-cold-war-explained-1535968

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The great sands of time come and wash over men, replacing the old faces and ideas with new faces, but their ideas and feelings remain analogous. Iran is a land as vast as the wealth of the great empire that once ruled it. In recent years the Islamic Republic of Iran has been hastening its involvement with an amalgamation of Shiite factions within Pakistan, primarily

those who are considered political or militaristic. Foreign Affairs specialists are classifying these interactions as an ever-intensifying series of proxy wars, with The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the third largest middle eastern country. In an interview with Fox News, Lieutenant colonel Anthony Shaffer, a former intelligence specialist now retired, commented on the situation stating.

By by user:Marc Mongenet, – CIA World Factbook,, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=30206
The Islamic Republic of Iran is intensifying its relationship with Saudi Arabia

“Iran is continuing to work to help rebel groups to form in the minority tribal region,” he stated.  “There are Sindhi and Baluch separatist groups that Iran will help fund and support.”

By Gage Skidmore, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=54308046
Lt. Col. Anthony Shaffer speaking in Washington, DC

The belief among the intelligence community as reported by Fox News, is that the Iranians for quite some time have continued to provide insurgent factions within Pakistan with large amounts of capital. The common suspicion is that they are acting in this way as a manner of undermining the intention of the United States within the region.

A conspicuous group is Tehrik-e-Jafaria Pakistan or in Urdu, (تحریکِ جعفریہ). The organization originated as Tehrik-e-Nifaz-e-Fiqh-e-Jararia or in Urdu, (تحریکِ نفاذِ فقہ جعفریہ). They consider themselves a political party and claim they haven’t taken part in any militant activities, despite their claims in January of 2002 the Pakistani government banned the group labeling it as a terrorist organization. The Deedar Ali, the vice president of TJP, forthrightly conceded to the fact that TJP is associated with Iran, but vehemently denies any and all accusations that Tehrik-e-Jafaria Pakistan has taken any role in the brutality. “We are alleged to be a militant group, but I refute this statement, We haven’t participated yet in militant activities, though we Shiites have the dominance in GB.”

Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=143805
Satellite imagery of Tehran. The capital city of Iran

TJP continues to profoundly dispel any rumors of receiving monetary gain from the Islamic Republic of Iran, even though the factions leaders visit Tehran, the capital city of Iran. “We operate under the direct guidance and control of Iran’s supreme leader, which binds us to travel to Iran,” Ali said, according to Fox News. “I won’t deny the fact that we receive a state guest honor upon our arrival in Iran because we support their ideology as we work together to formulate new strategies to gather mass support. But the members of this group present a monthly amount to run our campaigns; we don’t get funding from Iran.”

By Abigail Salem – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=48366375
Vector map of Saudi Arabia

The July report from the State Department, according to Fox News, named Iran as the paramount state sponsor for terrorism, a title Iran has held for many years. This feud leaves Pakistan in the middle of two arch enemies the Islamic Republic of Iran and The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

 

 

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Iran and Saudi Arabia